Nightlife Music Venue

Rams Head On Stage

33 West St., Annapolis, MD 21401
(410) 268-4545
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About Rams Head On Stage

The top music club under 500 seats in the world! This beautiful smoke-free, seated nightclub offers an amazing array of national talent. Food and beverage served before and during show.

Dining

Meals Served

- Dessert

- Dinner

- Late Night

Onsite

- Live Music/Entertainment


General

Accessibility

- Wheelchair


Dustbowl Revival
Rams Head On Stage

Dustbowl Revival

July 9, 2021

Dustbowl Revival has always been about pushing the boundaries of what American roots music can be. In many ways, they could have continued creating joyful, booty-shaking songs and cut-to-heart folk-rock ballads that lift up their transcendent live shows - and mining new energetic material from the place where folk music, funk and soul meet.   But the band’s newest album, Is It You, Is It Me, coming January 31 via their own Medium Expectations label and Nashville’s Thirty Tigers, is something different entirely. Produced by Sam Kassirer [Lake Street Dive, Josh Ritter] and engineered by Brian Joseph [Bon Iver, Sufjan Stevens], it represents the latest stage in a band that never stops evolving and refuses to stand still.   After celebrating over a decade of sonic adventuring, playing thousands of shows together in ten countries and counting, and collecting a devoted and growing fanbase coast-to-coast, the six core members -- founder Z. Lupetin, Liz Beebe, Josh Heffernan, Matt Rubin, Ulf Bjorlin and Connor Vance -- knew they had to create something bigger.   The scary novelty of this creative process exposed doubt and tension - but also brought out a new courage in the band to dig deeper than ever. The result is a sonic revelation and a reckoning. Maybe it captures a conversation that hasn’t happened yet: between people on both sides of a divide that simply don’t know how to talk to each other. Many of the songs are like plays unfolding verse by verse. It’s the yin-yang conversational harmony that is the true specialty of Z. Lupetin and co-lead singing dynamo Liz Beebe, who both grew up performing and writing in the theater. With a big brass-and-strings band building the sets around them, Is It You, Is It Me isn’t afraid to explore the personal and political tension that the group may have shied away from facing before.   The album tackles uneasy topics -- often where the political feels personal, especially in the defiant “Get Rid of You,” which was inspired by the student activists who emerged from the tragic Parkland High School shooting in Florida. The ominous driving brass groove of “Enemy,” sung powerfully by Beebe, hones in on a painful generational split between a daughter and her parents who may have voted in a tyrant, and have become strangers to her. This yearning search for common ground pervades the record as a whole.   The group’s signature intertwined vocal leads star on the opening track “Dreaming” which tackles the deep vulnerability of revealing your secrets and your soul every night in front of an audience. But where the band really sets on a new course is on lushly cinematic, orchestrated set pieces like “Mirror,” “Runaway” and, most notably, the current fan favorite and live showstopper “Sonic Boom,” about the struggle to reveal who you really are in the hidden, rose-colored world of social media. There’s a new widescreen expansiveness to these songs that wouldn’t be out of place in a packed arena or orchestra hall with a full neon light show. Acting like a nimble rock orchestra, each member played multiple instruments, and the group brought in new musicians on symphonic brass, and local friends to sing as a spur-of-the-moment choir.   Where does it all lead? If one thing is clear, Is It You, Is It Me represents another large leap forward for Dustbowl Revival, coming after their acclaimed self-titled 2017 album. Produced by Grammy-winner Ted Hutt (Old Crow Medicine Show, Drop Kick Murphy’s), It transitioned the group from a “roots dance party band” that continues to thrive on the festival circuit, to a nuanced ensemble embracing more soulful territory. That self-titled record was a direct bridge to the newest work, rising number to one on the Amazon Americana chart and featuring a funky favorite “Honey I Love You” where the band joyfully teaming up with blues master Keb Mo’. Their heartache folk number “Got Over”, surprised the band by racking up nearly seven million streams and counting online.   Dustbowl Revival’s story started humbly. Nearly 12 years ago Z. Lupetin - a Chicago native who attended college in Michigan came to L.A. to be a playwright and screenwriter, grew disillusioned with his job in advertising, and placed a hopeful ad on Craigslist. He sought to find fellow musicians who shared his roving love of Louis Armstrong, Bob Wills, Old Crow Medicine Show, Paul Simon, Aretha Franklin and the brass bands of New Orleans, but also wanted to write songs like Americana pioneers Wilco, Lucinda Williams and even Bruce Springsteen. There are still players in the group who responded to that initial odd quest.   “Maybe we don’t know where this journey will take us or how long it will last,” acknowledges Lupetin, “That’s my take on the importance of what we try to do. Music elevates us, lifts us up, makes us change our minds, takes us out of our comfort zones. If just one person can be moved by just one song, that’s enough.”

Richie Kotzen
Rams Head On Stage

Richie Kotzen

June 30, 2021

When a person turns 50, they usually spend that entire year celebrating in as large of a way as possible to make it their biggest and most memorable birthday yet. Singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist RICHIE KOTZEN is taking the concept literally, as he gears up for the release of his most ambitious album to date, and he wants to share this big birthday present to himself with his fans around the world. 50 FOR 50—his 22nd solo album—has just been released (Feb 3) via his own custom label, HeadroomInc. The self-produced three-disc collection is just what the title implies: a collection of 50 previously unreleased compositions produced, performed and written by KOTZEN in honor of his birthday. It’s the follow-up to his critically acclaimed SALTING EARTH album, which was released April 14 2017 via Headroom-Inc. Although KOTZEN has been hailed as a guitar virtuoso since the release of his first album, it is his emotional lead vocal delivery and diverse songwriting style that separates him from his peers thanks in large part to artists that influenced him in the Philly Soul R&B to Jazz, Rock, Funk, and Fusion Guitar genres. 50 FOR 50 captures the full artistic scope of what makes RICHIE KOTZEN such a unique artist. “The idea of a 50 song album came to me while I was on tour sometime last year,” KOTZEN explains. “I had completed what would have been your typical 10 to 12 song album and was anticipating a 2020 release. Somewhere along the line, I discovered a few completed songs that for whatever reason were never released. Along with that, I found a massive collection of material that was in various forms of completion. Some songs had drums bass and piano with no vocal, other songs were nothing more than a bass line and a vocal melody and so on. I decided to take that summer and fall, stay in the studio, and see how many of these ideas I could bring to completion. The concept was to include the already completed works and finish the other ideas and then stop once I reached 50 songs. Reality is we’ve got way more sitting on the hard drives waiting for attention. I figured if I can walk out of the studio with 50 songs (that I like) mixed and mastered, I can release a 50 song package on my 50th birthday.” The first song from 50 FOR 50, “Devil’s Hand,” touches on loss and regret while romanticizing a past that may or may not have been as it is being remembered in the present. About SALTING EARTH, Vintage Guitar hailed, “Presenting the best combo meal of blue-eyed soul, ripping guitar, and accessible tunes, this album continues KOTZEN’s prolific rise. His one-man-band production style serves an unfettered vision of passion and vulnerability.” While MusicRadar.com praised, “When RICHIE KOTZEN picks up his guitar, it literally speaks through him. Those familiar with the American singer/guitarist’s work or who have seen him live will know he occasionally hums along to the runs he’s executing, effortlessly showcasing a level of musicianship very few indeed ever get to. He embodies the kind of player that’s unequivocally in tune with their instrument, and able to improvise using purely the mind’s eye.”

Tuck & Patti
Rams Head On Stage

Tuck & Patti

June 29, 2021

Tuck and Patti are a musical marriage unparalleled in jazz. Patti Cathcart’s gospel-tinged voice can sear and soar. And Tuck Andress’ unique guitar playing evokes lush orchestras and ultra-funky R&B bands. It’s no wonder they’ve shared the stage with Miles, Dizzy, Ella, and dozens more jazz luminaries. But it may come as a surprise that Patti jammed with Jimi Hendrix in her Bay Area youth and Tuck toured with the GAP band for four years, his “graduate degree in soul music.” If you haven’t experienced the magic of this duo, you’ll be a lifelong fan after this concert.   Andress and Cathcart first met in the Bay Area in 1978. They knew almost instantly they that found lifetime musical partners in each other, so they formed a duo, guitarist and vocalist. Friendship and collaboration grew to love, and the two were married in 1981. Their recording career took off when Windham Hill Jazz signed them for 1988's groundbreaking Tears of Joy. This and several other Windham Hill albums put them on the map, and they've been solidifying their career, their musical conversation, their technique, and their love together ever since. They now have their own recording studio, as well as their own label, T&P Records, which licenses their CDs to major labels for distribution around the world. They tour Asia and Europe often, and they enjoy taking occasional time off from touring to teach at their Bay Area home, as well as doing workshops while on tour.

Mac McAnally
Rams Head On Stage

Mac McAnally

June 28, 2021

In some ways, award-winning songwriter, instrumentalist, producer and artist Mac McAnally is a paradox.   He is beyond dispute one of the most respected musicians of our time. His peers have made that clear by honoring him as CMA Musician of the Year for an unprecedented ten years, as well as electing him to the Nashville Songwriters Halls of Fame, the Mississippi Musicians Hall of Fame and the Alabama Music Hall of Fame.   Yet he is also one of the softest-spoken and self-effacing figures anywhere on the public stage. In fact, despite decades of recording countless sessions, releasing solo albums, and writing a parade of hits that include No. 1 singles for Kenny Chesney, Alabama, Sawyer Brown and Shenandoah, Mac seems a little uncomfortable in the spotlight. His reluctance to toot his own horn is a welcome anomaly these days - and that makes his accomplishments even more impressive.   For all that he has achieved, one dream remained elusive. Typically, it was Mac's altruism, rather than any drive toward greater fame, that made it happen.   Southbound is Mac's 16th album. It's packed with a generous selection of 16 tracks. And it's his first to feature his songs arranged for symphony orchestra. Recorded with the FestivalSouth orchestra conducted by Jay Dean and a rhythm section that includes Mac's colleagues in Jimmy Buffett's Coral Reefer Band, Southbound doesn't just give Mac's writing, instrumental skills and expressive vocals the attention they deserve. It also serves several worthy causes that speak personally to him: Extra Table, which brings food to the hungry in Mississippi, and the University of Southern Mississippi's music program.   The idea traces back to a performance by Mac at a fundraiser for another charity four or five years ago. The event was hosted by Robert St. John, Mississippi's top chef for three consecutive years, Mississippi Restauranteur of the Year and a generous supporter of charities too.   "While we were stuck in a dressing room while they were doing their silent auction, Robert started telling me about Extra Table, which he founded in my home state for underprivileged kids, of which we have many," Mac remembers. "Mississippi has always been one of the three poorest states in the union - usually the poorest. I said, 'If there's anything you ever need, let me know.' And he said, 'Oh, I'm about to.'"   Mac laughs and continues. "He told me about a fundraiser they do every year down in Hattiesburg, where he lives. He said, 'I'd love to hear some of your songs with orchestra.' And I said, 'Let's talk.'"   The marriage of large ensembles and popular songs had always intrigued Mac. His father's collection of big band jazz records planted that awareness. So did the countrypolitan classics he heard over the signals that trickled intermittently into the family radio back in Belmont, Mississippi. He also bought copies of the classical LPs that band directors at his school would sell when they were replaced each year. "Football and basketball were more important in the Southeast," he explains, with a smile.   So Mac accepted St. John's invitation and began contacting associates who could write orchestral arrangements, starting with Charles Rose of the Muscle Shoals Horns. Then he combed through his catalog for songs that would adapt well to the project. Plus a few that would be more of a challenge.   "When I wrote 'It's Easy' I was trying to write a classical piece," he notes. "So that lent itself very well to orchestration. But then I thought it might make for a better show if we added some songs that maybe didn't adapt so naturally - something like 'Junk Cars' . That lets the orchestra be playful and brings variety to the show too."   Mac shared his vision with each arranger as they worked out the string and horn parts. For certain songs, the guidepost was Randy Newman, with whom Mac had toured early in his career and whose orchestral settings he especially appreciated. He'd indicate details from his original recordings, perhaps a guitar or bass line, to transfer to other instruments, either suggesting harmonies to go with those parts or leaving them up to his collaborators.   When the charts were done, Mac premiered them live at a fundraising event with the FestivalSouth Orchestra, also directed and conducted by Jay Dean. After that performance and maybe half a dozen others that followed, he recalls, "Somebody said, 'Hey, this is good! We should record this!'"   So they did. Consisting of students plus some faculty and alumni from the Southern Mississippi Symphony Orchestra, the FestivalSouth orchestra illuminates and complements the material brilliantly throughout Southbound. Its minimal presence on "All These Years" [Live and Learn] and "Miracle" [Knots, 1994] conveys each lyric's sad intimacy. "On Account of You" [Down By the River, 2009] reflects Mac's fondness for Randy Newman's sound, though with a more positive message. The instrumentation swaggers playfully throughout "On the Line" [Nothin' But the Truth, 1983], tootles like a French Quarter jam throughout "Blame It on New Orleans" and threads an exotic theme around the seductive dance beat of "Zanzibar" [AKA Nobody, 2015].   In its variety, craftsmanship and emotional depth, Southbound would be a jewel in any artist's crown. But again, characteristically, Mac doesn't see it that way. Above all, to this son of Mississippi, it's a way to further enhance the lives of others through the channels that drew him originally to the project.   "One hundred percent of the artist and producer portions of Southbound go to the music program at the University of Southern Mississippi and to Extra Table," he says. "For every dollar that Extra Table gets, Robert St. John buys and distributes two dollars worth of food directly to kids who need it most. Some of them only eat what they get from school; they don't really get fed over the weekend."   Acknowledging that Southbound reflects his concern for the needy in his home state, Mac adds, "I don't believe it's limited to Mississippi. These songs apply to the South in general and beyond as well in the same way that William Faulkner wrote about universal concerns by focusing on only one county in Mississippi. And I hope its impact will linger beyond my lifetime in the same sense that a good Christmas album never gets old."

Martin Barre of Jethro Tull w. Original Members Dee Palmer & Clive Bunker
Rams Head On Stage

Martin Barre of Jethro Tull w. Original Members Dee Palmer & Clive Bunker

June 27, 2021

In 1969, a band of four English musicians arrived in New York and literally took America by storm. Over the next 50 years, this legendary band accumulated over 65 million record sales and a following of loyal fans that are the envy of rock bands worldwide! This band was Jethro Tull. At the centre of Tull’s unique sound is guitarist Martin Barre. Renowned for his formidable mastery of historic rifts, power chords and soaring melodic solos. Martin is celebrating the history of Jethro Tull, with a ‘Tour of Tours’. He will be bringing a spectacular show with his touring band, featuring Dan Crisp on lead vocals, Alan Thomson on keyboard, Darby Todd on Drums, with Becca Langsford and Alex Hart on vocals. Plus, two very special guests – Dee Palmer and Clive Bunker; both of whom performed with Tull for many years and were an important part of their success. The show will also feature a special multimedia presentation that, together with the music, highlights the 50 years of Jethro Tull musical career. It is the most significant Tull show of the past two decades, truly a very special concert that will do justice to the legend.

Jim Belushi & The Board of Comedy (6:30 Show)
Rams Head On Stage

Jim Belushi & The Board of Comedy (6:30 Show)

June 26, 2021

The first thing you need to know about Jim Belushi is that he’s a performer. Not just an actor, not just a comedian, not just a singer, but a performer. Which is pretty much all those things put together and multiplied by two or five or something. The second thing you need to know—and this is, in some way, more important than the first thing—is that he has absolutely no shame. None. Zip. Zero.   Jim has been a favorite of film, television and stage audiences for more than 30 years, one of the great leading character actors equally at home in drama and comedy, and a gifted performer who can also hold a room as front man of his rhythm and blues band.   A proud Chicagoan, Belushi graduated from Southern Illinois University with a degree in Speech, Education and Theatre before moving on to become a resident member of Chicago’s famed Second City for three years. In 1979 he left for Hollywood, where writer-producer Garry Marshall cast him in the Paramount Television series “Who’s Watching the Kids” and later in “Working Stiffs” with Michael Keaton. His Hollywood career took off from there.   In 1983, Jim wrote and appeared in Saturday Night Live for two seasons. Other television credits include starring in the Oliver Stone/ABC miniseries “Wild Palms” and the critically acclaimed series “Beggars and Choosers.” He guest-starred on “ER” and numerous other television shows. Most notably, Jim starred in the ABC hit comedy “According to Jim,” in which he played the husband in a marriage that actually works and the father of three children. He also served as executive producer, music composer and director. After wrapping 182 episodes for its eighth and final season, the family favorite series also hit a milestone when it launched into off-net syndication in 2007. In 2010, Belushi starred in CBS’s one-hour drama “The Defenders,” playing a colorful defense attorney in Las Vegas who would do anything to win for his clients.   Belushi has also had an illustrious film career. Jim’s first film was also Michael Mann’s first film. “Thief” was a dramatic film in which he played James Caan’s partner in crime. The he flip-flopped to a comedic role in “Trading Places.” But it was his work in Edward Zwick’s “About Last Night” with Rob Lowe and Demi Moore that brought Belushi his first serious attention as a film star. In the 1986 feature, he reprised the role that he had played on stage in David Mamet’s Obie Award-winning “Sexual Perversity in Chicago,” from which the film was adapted. His feature credits since then show an extraordinary range: He was James Woods’ spacey DJ buddy, Dr. Rock, in Oliver Stone’s “Salvador;” the mentally handicapped dishwasher befriended by Whoopi Goldberg in the Andrei Konchalovsky film, “Homer and Eddie;” and the defiant high school principal standing up to drug dealers in “The Principal.” In 2010, Belushi traveled to Berlin to shoot the part of a hard-talking publisher in Roman Polanski’s “The Ghost.”   Other dramatic and comic film roles include the “K-9” franchise for Universal Studios with the beloved Jerry Lee, “Joe Somebody,” “Red Heat” with Arnold Schwarzenegger, John Hughes’ “Curly Sue,” “Taking Care of Business,” “Once Upon a Crime,” “Return to Me,” “Mr. Destiny,” “Only the Lonely,” “The Man with One Red Shoe,” “Real Men,” “Jumpin’ Jack Flash,” “Jingle All the Way,” “Retroactive,” “Underdog,” and one of Jim’s favorites, “Gang Related” with Tupac Shakur. You will also see him in the upcoming independent features “The Secret Lives of Dorks,” “Undrafted,” and “North of Hell” with Patrick Wilson and Katherine Heigl. Additionally, he voiced the Squirrel in the animated feature “The Wild” and the Woodsman in the animated feature “Hoodwinked.” He has leant his voice to hundreds of animated television shows including “The Mighty Ducks,” “The Tick,” “Pinky and the Brain,” “Hey Arnold,” “Rugrats,” “AAAHH! Real Monsters,” “Scooby Doo,” and “Superman.”   Belushi has also stayed close to his stage background, both on and off- Broadway. In 2011, he made his way to the Great White Way and earned rave reviews as the star of Garson Kanin’s “Born Yesterday.” This revival was directed by Tony Award-winning director Doug Hughes. His previous stage appearances include on Broadway in Herb Gardner’s acclaimed “Conversations with My Father” at the Royal Theatre and for Joseph Papp as the Pirate King in “Pirates of Penzance.” He starred off-Broadway in Sam Shephard’s “True West” at the Cherry Lane Theatre, in the Williamstown Theatre Festival production of John Guare’s “Moon Over Miami,” and in Richard Nelson’s “Baal” at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago.   Besides acting, Jim is also a musician. Jim and Dan Aykroyd, together as The Blues Brothers, opened for The Rolling Stones at Soldier Field in Chicago in 2005 and performed at the SARS benefit in Toronto for over 400,000 people, in which the Rolling Stones also performed. Jim also headlines his own group, The Sacred Hearts, which is the official house band for the House of Blues chain of venues. They are a rhythm and blues band that performs 40 nights a year at clubs, casinos and corporate events all over the country. For over 18 years, with harmonica in hand, Belushi and the bands have entertained President Clinton, Vice President Gore, Senators and other politicians. Belushi and Aykroyd recorded an album entitled “Have Love, Will Travel” that was number one on the blues chart. Additionally, Belushi recorded and released three other albums: “Blues Brothers Live from Chicago,” The Sacred Hearts’ “36 x 22 x 36,” and the soundtrack to “According to Jim.”   Jim Belushi added authorship to his repertoire when he released his first book in 2006 entitled Real Men: According to Jim. In the book, Jim explains how to do just about everything- from picking up women and choosing your friends to sticking up for yourself.   Most recently, Belushi teamed up with his “According to Jim” co-star Larry Joe Campbell and four other talented and funny Second City alumni to create “Jim Belushi and the Board of Comedy.” The group brings an improvised comedy sketch show to stages at colleges, comedy clubs, performing arts centers, corporate events, and casinos nationwide.   A dedicated husband and father, Belushi has little time outside career and family. In his spare time he participates with many charities in the community and beyond.

Jim Belushi & The Board of Comedy (9:30 Show)
Rams Head On Stage

Jim Belushi & The Board of Comedy (9:30 Show)

June 26, 2021

The first thing you need to know about Jim Belushi is that he’s a performer. Not just an actor, not just a comedian, not just a singer, but a performer. Which is pretty much all those things put together and multiplied by two or five or something. The second thing you need to know—and this is, in some way, more important than the first thing—is that he has absolutely no shame. None. Zip. Zero.   Jim has been a favorite of film, television and stage audiences for more than 30 years, one of the great leading character actors equally at home in drama and comedy, and a gifted performer who can also hold a room as front man of his rhythm and blues band.   A proud Chicagoan, Belushi graduated from Southern Illinois University with a degree in Speech, Education and Theatre before moving on to become a resident member of Chicago’s famed Second City for three years. In 1979 he left for Hollywood, where writer-producer Garry Marshall cast him in the Paramount Television series “Who’s Watching the Kids” and later in “Working Stiffs” with Michael Keaton. His Hollywood career took off from there.   In 1983, Jim wrote and appeared in Saturday Night Live for two seasons. Other television credits include starring in the Oliver Stone/ABC miniseries “Wild Palms” and the critically acclaimed series “Beggars and Choosers.” He guest-starred on “ER” and numerous other television shows. Most notably, Jim starred in the ABC hit comedy “According to Jim,” in which he played the husband in a marriage that actually works and the father of three children. He also served as executive producer, music composer and director. After wrapping 182 episodes for its eighth and final season, the family favorite series also hit a milestone when it launched into off-net syndication in 2007. In 2010, Belushi starred in CBS’s one-hour drama “The Defenders,” playing a colorful defense attorney in Las Vegas who would do anything to win for his clients.   Belushi has also had an illustrious film career. Jim’s first film was also Michael Mann’s first film. “Thief” was a dramatic film in which he played James Caan’s partner in crime. The he flip-flopped to a comedic role in “Trading Places.” But it was his work in Edward Zwick’s “About Last Night” with Rob Lowe and Demi Moore that brought Belushi his first serious attention as a film star. In the 1986 feature, he reprised the role that he had played on stage in David Mamet’s Obie Award-winning “Sexual Perversity in Chicago,” from which the film was adapted. His feature credits since then show an extraordinary range: He was James Woods’ spacey DJ buddy, Dr. Rock, in Oliver Stone’s “Salvador;” the mentally handicapped dishwasher befriended by Whoopi Goldberg in the Andrei Konchalovsky film, “Homer and Eddie;” and the defiant high school principal standing up to drug dealers in “The Principal.” In 2010, Belushi traveled to Berlin to shoot the part of a hard-talking publisher in Roman Polanski’s “The Ghost.”   Other dramatic and comic film roles include the “K-9” franchise for Universal Studios with the beloved Jerry Lee, “Joe Somebody,” “Red Heat” with Arnold Schwarzenegger, John Hughes’ “Curly Sue,” “Taking Care of Business,” “Once Upon a Crime,” “Return to Me,” “Mr. Destiny,” “Only the Lonely,” “The Man with One Red Shoe,” “Real Men,” “Jumpin’ Jack Flash,” “Jingle All the Way,” “Retroactive,” “Underdog,” and one of Jim’s favorites, “Gang Related” with Tupac Shakur. You will also see him in the upcoming independent features “The Secret Lives of Dorks,” “Undrafted,” and “North of Hell” with Patrick Wilson and Katherine Heigl. Additionally, he voiced the Squirrel in the animated feature “The Wild” and the Woodsman in the animated feature “Hoodwinked.” He has leant his voice to hundreds of animated television shows including “The Mighty Ducks,” “The Tick,” “Pinky and the Brain,” “Hey Arnold,” “Rugrats,” “AAAHH! Real Monsters,” “Scooby Doo,” and “Superman.”   Belushi has also stayed close to his stage background, both on and off- Broadway. In 2011, he made his way to the Great White Way and earned rave reviews as the star of Garson Kanin’s “Born Yesterday.” This revival was directed by Tony Award-winning director Doug Hughes. His previous stage appearances include on Broadway in Herb Gardner’s acclaimed “Conversations with My Father” at the Royal Theatre and for Joseph Papp as the Pirate King in “Pirates of Penzance.” He starred off-Broadway in Sam Shephard’s “True West” at the Cherry Lane Theatre, in the Williamstown Theatre Festival production of John Guare’s “Moon Over Miami,” and in Richard Nelson’s “Baal” at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago.   Besides acting, Jim is also a musician. Jim and Dan Aykroyd, together as The Blues Brothers, opened for The Rolling Stones at Soldier Field in Chicago in 2005 and performed at the SARS benefit in Toronto for over 400,000 people, in which the Rolling Stones also performed. Jim also headlines his own group, The Sacred Hearts, which is the official house band for the House of Blues chain of venues. They are a rhythm and blues band that performs 40 nights a year at clubs, casinos and corporate events all over the country. For over 18 years, with harmonica in hand, Belushi and the bands have entertained President Clinton, Vice President Gore, Senators and other politicians. Belushi and Aykroyd recorded an album entitled “Have Love, Will Travel” that was number one on the blues chart. Additionally, Belushi recorded and released three other albums: “Blues Brothers Live from Chicago,” The Sacred Hearts’ “36 x 22 x 36,” and the soundtrack to “According to Jim.”   Jim Belushi added authorship to his repertoire when he released his first book in 2006 entitled Real Men: According to Jim. In the book, Jim explains how to do just about everything- from picking up women and choosing your friends to sticking up for yourself.   Most recently, Belushi teamed up with his “According to Jim” co-star Larry Joe Campbell and four other talented and funny Second City alumni to create “Jim Belushi and the Board of Comedy.” The group brings an improvised comedy sketch show to stages at colleges, comedy clubs, performing arts centers, corporate events, and casinos nationwide.   A dedicated husband and father, Belushi has little time outside career and family. In his spare time he participates with many charities in the community and beyond.

The Iron Maidens
Rams Head On Stage

The Iron Maidens

June 25, 2021

Formed in 2001, The Iron Maidens have quickly established themselves as one of southern California’s most popular tribute acts and are rapidly gaining international recognition. The band boasts beauty as well as excellent musicianship, lively stage presence, and a remarkable stage show with theatrical scenes interspersed throughout.   First and foremost on the agenda of The Iron Maidens is talent. These women are highly trained professionals with diversified musical backgrounds ranging from orchestral and musical theater to blues and rock. The band and its members have been the recipients of many awards including best tribute band, and best in category (guitar, bass, drums, voice) at events such as The Rock City News Awards, The LA Music Awards, and The All Access Magazine Award Show to name a few. The line-up is Kirsten “Bruce Chickinson” Rosenberg on vocals, Linda “Nikki McBURRain” McDonald on drums, Courtney “Adriana Smith” Cox and Nikki “Davina Murray” Stringfield on guitars, and Wanda “Steph Harris” Ortiz on bass.   The Iron Maidens cover Iron Maiden material from all eras of the band’s career, encompassing the band’s biggest hits as well as fan favorites. The stage show includes appearances by Maiden mascot Eddie, the grimreaper, the devil and more.   The Iron Maidens have packed houses everywhere they have played.

Steve Earle & The Dukes
Rams Head On Stage

Steve Earle & The Dukes

June 24, 2021

When asked about what drove him to craft his deeply evocative new album, Ghosts of West Virginia , Steve Earle says that he was interested in exploring a new approach to his songwriting. “I’ve already made the preaching-to-the-choir album,” he says, specifically alluding to his 2004 album, The Revolution Starts Now . As anyone as politically attuned as Earle understands, there are times when the faithful need music that will raise their spirits and toughen their resolve. But he came to believe that our times might also benefit from something that addresses a different audience, songs written from a point of view that he is particularly capable of rendering. “I thought that, given the way things are now, it was maybe my responsibility to make a record that spoke to and for people who didn’t vote the way that I did,” he says. “One of the dangers that we’re in is if people like me keep thinking that everybody who voted for Trump is a racist or an asshole, then we’re fucked, because it’s simply not true. So this is one move toward something that might take a generation to change. I wanted to do something where that dialogue could begin.” Ghosts of West Virginia centers on the Upper Big Branch coal mine explosion that killed twenty-nine men in that state in 2010, making it one of the worst mining disasters in American history. Investigations revealed hundreds of safety violations, as well as attempts to cover them up. The mine’s owners agreed to pay more than $200 million in criminal liabilities, and shut the mine down. In ten deftly drawn, roughly eloquent, powerfully conveyed sonic portraits, Earle and his long-time band the Dukes explore the historical role of coal in rural communities. More than merely a question of jobs and income, mining has provided a sense of unity and meaning, patriotic pride and purpose. As sons followed their fathers and older brothers into the mines, generational bonds were forged. “You can’t just tell these people that you’re going to shut the coal mines without also telling them what you’re going to do to take care of them, to protect their lives,” Earle explains. To be sure, Earle’s politics have not changed. He believes in sustainable energy sources and ending fossil fuels. “But that doesn’t mean a thing in West Virginia,” he says. You can’t begin communicating with people unless you understand the texture of their lives, the realities that provide significance to their days. That is the entire point of Ghosts of West Virginia . Earle started working on the album after being approached by Jessica Blank and Erik Jensen, a playwright team that would eventually create Coal Country , a theater piece about the Upper Big Branch disaster. Earle had previously worked with them on The Exonerated , an Off-Broadway play about wrongfully imprisoned people who ultimately proved their innocence and got released. Earle describes Blank and Jensen as creating “documentary theater,” and they received a commission from the Public Theater in New York. They interviewed the surviving West Virginia miners, along with the families of the miners who died, and created monologues for their characters using those words. Working closely with Oskar Eustis, the Public’s Artistic Director, they workshopped the songs and text for nearly four years. Earle functions as “a Greek chorus with a guitar,” in his words. He is on stage the entire play and, along with his song “The Mountain,” performs seven songs from Ghosts of West Virginia . “The actors don’t relate directly with the audience,” he explains. “I do. The actors don’t realize the audience is there. I do.” The songs provide personal, historical and social context for the testimony of the play’s characters, and, heard on their own, along with the album’s three additional songs, they provide a wrenchingly emotional portrait of a world that Earle knows well. “I felt that I could do it because so many of those people own Copperhead Road -- and I talk like this,” Earle says in the unreconstructed Texas drawl that has survived moves to Nashville and New York City, where he now lives. Ghosts of West Virginia opens with “Heaven Ain’t Goin’ Nowhere,” a stark, a cappella spiritual that, in its sound and in its sense, captures the blend of faith and stoicism characteristic of mining communities. Without being explicit, “Union God and Country” nods to the deep union history of the West Virginia mines, a history that is being wiped out. “This was the most unionized place in America until the Nineties,” Earle points out. “Upper Big Branch was the first non-union mine in that area and it blew up and killed twenty-nine guys. That’s the deal.” “Devil Put the Coal in the Ground” is an expression of what Earle calls “a kind of hillbilly mindfulness” – a tough-minded recognition of the dangers of the mining life and the pride of doing such a demanding job in the face of those dangers. “The guy in that song is a miner and he’s being real about what he’s doing,” Earle says. On “John Henry Was a Steel Driving Man,” Earle, as so many have done before, takes the folkloric tale of the hammer-wielding hero and updates it for a contemporary world in which automation and union-busting have drained miners’ lives of so much of their potential and significance. “Time Is Never On Our Side” was inspired by the four-day wait that four Upper Big Branch families endured because rescue teams found footprints in the mine that they believed might belong to miners they had not yet found. It turns out the footprints belonged to company managers who had entered the mine before the inspectors arrived, and failed to reveal that they had done so. The familial devastation wreaked by the mining disaster finds expression in “It’s About Blood,” in which, under a driving rhythm, Earle blazons the names of all the men who died in it. “If I Could See Your Face,” which closes Coal Country , is the only song that Earle does not sing. In the play, it’s sung by the actress Mary Bacon, while, on the album, that distinction goes to Eleanor Whitmore, who plays fiddle and mandolin in the Dukes. She delivers the ballad, a chronicle of memory, longing and loss, in a manner that is both feeling and plain-spoken, perfectly suited to its subject. Despite its grim subject, “Black Lung” is rollicking and unsentimental, and it includes the verse that Earle describes as “the most important thing for me to say on this record”: “If I’d never been down in a coal mine,/I’da lived a lot longer/Hell, that ain’t a close call/But then again I’da never had anything/And half a life is better than nothin’ at all.” Those words were the last lyrics Earle wrote for the album, and they convey the reality of the lives that mining made possible for rural folk, regardless of the dangers. “Fastest Man Alive” is a paean to Chuck Yeager, a West Virginia native who became a war hero and the first pilot to travel faster than the speed of sound. Earle treats him like a folk hero along the lines of John Henry and Davy Crockett (who, like Yeager, was a real person). Yeager’s life of risk in the sky offers a moving contrast to the miners facing danger underground, often unseen and unacknowledged. The album’s closing song, “The Mine,” was the first that Earle wrote, even though it was not included in Coal Country . It quietly gives voice to the hopes and fraternal bonds that a job in the mines once represented. Earle and the Dukes recorded Ghosts of West Virginia at Electric Lady Studios, which Jimi Hendrix built in Greenwich Village, where Earle lives. That the album was mixed in mono lends it a sonic cohesion and punch, while losing none of the finely drawn delineation that the Dukes’ characteristically eloquent playing provides. More personally, however, the album is in mono because Earle has lost hearing in one ear and can no longer discern the separation that stereo is designed to produce. His partial deafness is not the result of exposure to loud volume that afflicts many musicians. He woke up one morning unable to hear in his right ear, and doctors have been unable to identify a cause. He’s been told a virus is likely the reason, but one doctor told him, “That’s what we say when we don’t know what the cause is.” As a result, Earle says, jokingly, “If I can’t hear the album in stereo, nobody else will either!” The Dukes, too, suffered a major loss when, not long before the band went into the studio, bassist Kelley Looney, who had played with Earle for thirty years, passed away. Beyond the death of a longstanding partner in crime, Earle was faced with the prospect of finding someone who could share the telepathic musical communication so characteristic of the Dukes. Happily, Jeff Hill, who had previously worked with Earle and had most recently been part of the Chris Robinson Brotherhood, perfectly fit the bill. “Jeff stepped into the breach, but it was hard. It was really hard,” Earle says. Hill joined Whitmore, guitarist Chris Masterson, Ricky Jay Jackson on pedal steel, drummer Brad Pemberton and, of course, Earle on guitar and banjo. Their raw blend of country, rock and folk lifts the articulation of each song without the slightest hint of contrivance or pretension. With Ghosts of West Virginia , Steve Earle has evoked a world as three-dimensional and dramatic as Coal Country , the play in which it found its origins, does on stage. That’s appropriate, because, as Earle says, “I came to New York to make music for theater, and it’s taken a long time. Theater is a powerful thing. It’s my favorite art form. It always has been. My ambition is to write an old-fashioned American musical. I’m a pretty good songwriter, and I just feel like I want to do that before I die.” For now, however, there is Coal Country – and Ghosts of West Virginia . “I said I wanted to speak to people that didn’t necessarily vote the way that I did,” he says, “but that doesn’t mean we don’t have anything in common. We need to learn how to communicate with each other. My involvement in this project is my little contribution to that effort. And the way to do that – and to do it impeccably – is simply to honor those guys who died at Upper Big Branch.”   Steve Earle is one of the most acclaimed singer-songwriters of his generation, a worthy heir to Townes Van Zandt and Guy Clark, his two supreme musical mentors. Over the course of twenty studio albums, Earle has distinguished himself as a master storyteller, and his songs have been recorded by a vast array of artists, including Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez, Emmylou Harris, the Pretenders, and more. Earle’s 1986 debut album, Guitar Town , is now regarded as a classic of the Americana genre, and subsequent releases like The Revolution Starts...Now (2004), Washington Square Serenade (2007), and TOWNES (2009) all received Grammy Awards. Restlessly creative across artistic disciplines, Earle has published both a novel and a collection of short stories; produced albums for other artists; and acted in films, TV shows and on stage. He currently hosts a radio show for Sirius XM. In 2019, Earle appeared in the off-Broadway play Samara , for which he also wrote a score that The New York Times described as “exquisitely subliminal.” Each year, Earle organizes a benefit concert for the Keswell School, which his son John Henry attends and which provides educational programs for children and young adults with autism.

Bob James
Rams Head On Stage

Bob James

June 21, 2021

Bob James’ recordings have practically defined pop/jazz and crossover during the past decades. Very influenced by pop and movie music, he has often featured famous musicians who add a jazz touch to what is essentially an instrumental pop set. Born on Christmas day in 1939, the multi-Grammy® winner Bob James was discovered by Quincy Jones who released his first album “Bold Conceptions” (1963), a free jazz exploration. After a period with Sarah Vaughan (1965-1968), he reunited with Jones as a studio musician. During this period, Bob released “Nautilus”, one of the most heavily sampled albums in hip-hop that earned him the status of “Godfather of Hip-Hop”! After great commercial successes he collaborated with David Sanborn and Earl Klugh. He then founded the contemporary jazz quartet Fourplay with Lee Ritenour (later replaced by Larry Carlton), Nathan East and Harvey Mason. With the completion and release of “Espresso”, his first album as leader since 2006 the legendary pianist is once again in the spotlight.

Rhonda Ross
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Rhonda Ross

June 20, 2021

Rhonda Ross graces the stage with the gravitas and glamour of a modern-day spirit queen. Described as a cross between Jill Scott and Nina Simone, Rhonda uses her music to gently guide her listeners to feel their personal power and experience their innermost joy. Exquisitely sewing together strands of neo-soul, jazz and funk, her lyrics speak to the everyday struggles we all experience and how to thrive in the midst of them. Rhonda’s music is free, alive and improvisational. As a singer, songwriter, actress and social artist, her lyrics inspire, empower and uplift all those who experience them.   Similar to her legendary mother, Diana Ross, Rhonda holds audiences in the palm of her hand and it has become evident that she not only has the talent, but also the significance to carry on her mother’s legacy, all while establishing her own unique musical destination. Rhonda’s most recent release, In Case You Didn’t Know, is available everywhere music is sold.

Dana Fuchs
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Dana Fuchs

June 19, 2021

Dana Fuchs has never dealt in nostalgia. For this questing artist, it’s not about the rear-view but the road ahead. The next song. The next session. Tonight’s show and tomorrow’s bus ride. But as Dana sheds her musical skin with her triumphant fourth album Love Lives On, it seems a fitting juncture to rewind the reels and thumb a backstory as compelling as any in rock ‘n’ roll. This life and times doesn’t always make for easy reading. The triumphs are laced by tragedy, ugliness, injustice. But whatever the obstacles, music and love have been the beacons that guide her on.   As one of New York City’s favorite daughters, it’s tempting to imagine that Dana’s career began amidst the subterranean throb in the clubs on the Lower East Side. It’s true: that city was her birthplace and springboard to fame. But to truly grasp her artistic motivations, you’d have to follow the family’s car towards Florida, and rattle along the dirt tracks until you hit Wildwood: a backwoods town, population 2000, where black and white were split along battlelines and distrust simmered in the air. “Back in the ’70s, it was a sorta small, racist town,” remembers Dana, who dropped a social hand-grenade by dating a black friend. “We were a big family from New York, Irish-Catholic, there was no one like us in the area. I tended to gravitate more towards the African-American community. I felt more accepted by them.”   Dana and her five older siblings ran wild in the woods (she remembers herself as a “tomboy with dirt under my nails”). Yet this was no picture-perfect childhood, the family’s mood and rhythm set by her father: a former Marine in daily conflict with his demons. “He was a very tortured soul who had one of the most brutal lives of anyone I’ve ever known,” explains Dana of the patriarch commemorated in Faithful Sinner, one of the songs she wrote for the album. “He was tortured by his father and molested by his mother. His beatings only stopped because his father took his own life. My father found him. With all that pain, he was most certainly a flawed parent. He could also be very angry and scary, especially when he drank. Still, we knew he loved us.”   If the household was fractious, then music was always the balm. Ostracised at school, Dana found solace in the stomp-and-holler gospel of her local Baptist church, but it was the British classic rock blasted out by her siblings – The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, Queen, Fleetwood Mac – that lit a lightbulb over her head. “That’s when I knew I had to do music,” she explains. “When I started hearing that stuff, at 10 or 11, I stopped listening to other music completely. Later on, I appreciated my parents’ music – Hank Williams, Ray Charles, Billie Holiday – but when I heard the old classic rock ‘n’ roll, I lost my mind over that stuff.”   Dana’s musical appetite was bottomless, and when fronting a band at a local Holiday Inn was no longer enough, the 19-year-old singer hatched a bolder plan. At this time, New York did not hold happy associations. The city had been the backdrop to the tragic death of Dana’s beloved elder sister, Donna. “She and my brother Don had a band, quite popular in the South. She went up to New York City to find her fame and fortune. She took a lot of wrong turns and tragically ended her life.”   Any other 19-year-old might have run a mile from New York’s bearpit music scene, but Dana used the pain as her fuel (“Donna’s suicide,” she says, “catapulted me from despair to determination to fulfil our shared dream of music”). Yet she still needed a foil. One fateful day, pounding the sidewalks of the Lower East Side, Dana heard the missing puzzle-piece, in the form of Jon Diamond: a heavyweight session guitarist who could already boast credits with Joan Osborne and others. “I was walking by this little club and I heard his guitar from the sidewalk,” she recalls of the musical partnership that flourishes to this day. “I introduced myself to Jon on the break, told him I thought he was great, and that I had come to New York to be a singer. So, he invited me up to sing, and I faked Stormy Monday. Afterwards, he said, ‘You have a good instrument, but you really need to learn what you’re doing’.”   After Jon exposed her to his encyclopedic blues vinyl collection, Dana’s astonishing natural vocal prowess took on new depth and nuance. And so they were ready. Together, Jon and Dana hit the Lower East Side’s live circuit like a wrecking ball, holding their own on bills featuring titans like James Cotton and Taj Mahal, and quickly earning a residency at the Red Lion club. Four nights a week, they shook the foundations until 3am, but there was already the sense they could be far more than a rocking covers band. “Every Tuesday night,” Dana recalls, “we'd play all night, and that's where we wrote our first handful of tunes and we’d try them out on the crowd.”   Drawn by the pair’s original songs and incendiary performances, those crowds were soon stretching round the block, at mythologised hot-spots like Arlene’s Grocery, The Mercury Lounge and B.B. King’s Blues Club. In the studio, meanwhile, Dana and Jon planted their flag with 2003’s Lonely For A Lifetime: an opening gambit that fizzed with potential, splicing a ’60s Stax/Volt vibe with the driving grit of the Stones, and fusing the dark wit and wisdom of Bob Dylan, Tom Waits and Lucinda Williams. “They’re about addiction and religious hypocrisy,” she noted of tunes like Strung Out and Bible Baby, “and like all the tracks on the album, deal with subjects that I have a deep personal experience with.”   By now, all eyes were on her, and after being spotted by musicians from Broadway’s orchestra pits, Dana won the lead in the hit musical Love, Janis, followed up by the role of Sadie in 2007’s Golden Globe-nominated cult movie, Across The Universe. “We’d been slugging away in New York,” she recalls, “and then I got the show playing Janis Joplin five nights a week. Jon taught me Piece Of My Heart and I went down – and that was it. That led to Across The Universe. The director, Julie Taymor, asked if I could act. So of course, I lied and said, ‘Oh yeah!’”   The demands of stage and screen inevitably impacted on the band’s studio output. But in 2011, the catalogue was thrillingly reignited by Love To Beg, crowned by the UK’s Classic Rock magazine as blues album of the month on the strength of devastating songs like Keep On Rollin’ and Keepsake, which addressed Dana and Jon’s brief (and ill-fated) romantic coupling. “We fought like cats and dogs,” she grins. “The first two weeks we were together, we were breaking up every day.”   Still deeper depths were plumbed on 2013’s “blisteringly good” Bliss Avenue: an album that saw Dana battling back into the light after the death of her brother, and reaching for redemption on cuts like So Hard To Move and Vagabond Wind. “It really purged my soul,” she said, “in a starker, more naked way, lyrically and musically”.   It takes a brave artist to rip it up and start again. But Love Lives On is the best kind of evolution, seeing Dana burst defiant from her darkest days with a sound inspired by the siren call of American soul. “It’s a new beginning for me in every way,” she says. “I’m looking forward to starting chapter two.”   Rest assured, you’ll find all the factors that have helped her conquer the modern music scene, with 13 new songs that offer heart-on-sleeve songwriting, stellar musicianship and the ragged vocal that Classic Rock described as “juke-joint dirty and illicit, evoking Joplin, Jagger and a cigarette bobbing in a glass of bourbon”.   But this time there’s a new creative freedom, borne of Dana completing her existing record contract, contemplating a blank canvas and crowdfunding the record that she was burning to make. “I was at an interesting crossroads,” she remembers. “When my contract was up, I felt a sense of relief that I really held the reins for my next move. I need to be running things. I decided to start my own label called Get Along Records, and to get out of New York and go to the home of the music that inspired me to follow my passion: the Memphis Southern soul of Stax/Volt, Hi Records and Sun Studios. From Otis Redding to Al Green to Johnny Cash. All huge influences.”   For better and worse, the record was also shaped by emotional extremes, as Dana weathered the loss of three beloved family members, before the storm clouds parted with the birth of her son. “Initially, it felt the worst timing to have a baby,” she says, “and I couldn’t have been more wrong. The shift from grief to joy was the most powerful and empowering experience I’ve ever lived. The opportunity arose to take all of the pain from the family loss, the miraculous love of a new baby and put it in a body of music. This album is all about hope and perseverance.”   With her raw emotions at the surface, Dana hit the album sessions in Memphis with purpose. Armed with songs mostly penned with Jon, the singer found an immediate telepathy with producer Kevin Houston (North Mississippi Allstars, Luther Dickinson, The Bo-Keys, Ian Siegal) and a crack-squad studio band that took in original Hi organist Charles Hodges, Stax heavyweight Steve Potts on drums, keys wizard Glenn Patscha and first-call bassist Jack Daley. “It was so fast and easy,” Dana reflects, “like I’ve never experienced before. Unbelievable mutual respect and admiration between everyone. Not one ego, ever.”   On Love Lives On, the songs are the stars. The album opens in commanding style with Backstreet Baby, driven by grooving guitars, a spring-heeled horn section and a savagely beautiful vocal telling of a woman with “nothing to lose”. Cuts don’t come funkier than Ain’t Nobody’s Fault But Mine, while Callin’ Angels fuses upbeat gospel with a poignant lyric. “It has a verse for each family member,” explains Dana. “It’s become a song of conjuring our loved ones in our hearts at every show.”   Elsewhere, the bittersweet Sittin’ On rides on clipped guitar, Sad Solution offers an effervescent strut, while the vulnerable and reflective title track – written by Dana as she watched her mother slip away in a Florida hospital following an 11-day vigil – traces the circle of life. “This song is about the experience of losing a mother and then becoming one. Letting go of the first love of my life. Lying next to her as she passed, wishing I had asked her so many things. Wishing I had more time.”   Out of darkness comes light. And out of that fascinating early career emerges an older, wiser Dana Fuchs, armed with the album of her life. New label. New studio. New sound. New possibilities for an artist who has so far only hinted at her potential. “I sure hope those who’ve been with me all along will feel as passionately as I do about it,” she concludes. “And that those who have yet to hear me will now come on board. Love Lives On is almost like a second child to me. It’s who I am at this moment in time, captured on tape…”

The Quebe Sisters
Rams Head On Stage

The Quebe Sisters

June 16, 2021

With over fifteen years of touring to date, The Quebe Sisters have delivered their authentic triple fiddle and three-part harmony sound to the concert halls and festivals of North America and Europe.   Grace, Sophia, and Hulda Quebe front an innovative Progressive Western Swing band of archtop guitar, upright bass, fiddles and sibling harmony. The Dallas-based five-piece presents a unique Americana blend of Western Swing, Jazz-influenced Swing, Country, Texas-Style Fiddling, and Western music.   “We differentiate our music as ‘Progressive Western Swing’ from simply ‘Western Swing’ because we aren’t trying to sound just like Bob Wills,” Grace Quebe explains. “Instead, we continue his vision, playing the style he pioneered in an authentic way by incorporating new genres and songs, interpreting them using our own unique voice through Country instrumentation.”   The band’s stripped-down acoustic instrumentation breathes new life into seasoned sounds once found in Texas dance halls and honky-tonks. Grace continues, “To us, preserving the tradition of Western Swing isn’t about keeping something alive like a relic. Western Swing has always been about innovation.”   Innovation has led the sisters to channel the musical connection between danceability and emotiveness, combining old sounds with new feelings and old feelings with new sounds. It’s not nostalgia that drives the band as purveyors of Western Swing, but the aspiration to take the music back to its roots and sustain the spirit of Swing.   Combine the musical stylings of The Mills Brothers, Ray Price, Count Basie, Willie Nelson, and you have none other than The Quebe Sisters.

Shaw Davis & The Black Ties
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Shaw Davis & The Black Ties

June 14, 2021

Shaw Davis is rapidly establishing himself in the realm of Roots & Blues Rock. Born April 4, 1995, the young guitarist has burst his way onto the scene and is already revered as one of the top Blues Rock guitarists today. Named as one of the "Top 50 Modern Blues and Rock Artists In 2019" by Rock and Blues Muse, Shaw Davis & The Black Ties feature their own brand of Hard Blues, Psychedelia, and Roots Rock that continues to win over fans and crowds across the country. Backed by drummer, Bobby Van Stone, and bassist, Patrick Stevenson, the power trio has become a mainstay on the national club circuit and have opened shows for acts such as Blackberry Smoke, Foghat, The Guess Who, Samantha Fish, Chris Duarte, Mike Zito, Albert Castiglia, Matt Schofield, Popa Chubby, GE Smith, JP Soars, Anthony Gomes and Eric Tessmer. Formed in the summer of 2016 out of Pompano Beach, Florida, the bands second album Tales From The West was nominated for three Independent Blues Music awards. Currently, the group is working on their third studio album with, producer and former guitarist for Johnny Winter, Paul Nelson at the helm. The album is set to release in January of 2020.   "A three-man wrecking crew that infuse the Blues with Hard Rock to gratifying effect." –The Rock Doctor

Keb' Mo' **All Ages Matinee**
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Keb' Mo' **All Ages Matinee**

June 13, 2021

Keb’ Mo’s self-titled release under his coined Keb’ Mo’ moniker, reached it’s quarter century milestone in 2019, and over the years, Keb’ has proven that he is a musical force that defies typical genre labels. Album after album, 14 in total, he has garnered 5 GRAMMY awards, including his most recent 2019 release, Oklahoma, which won in the Best Americana Album category. Keb’s list of GRAMMY recognitions continues with 12 GRAMMY nominations, in total, including his 2014 self-produced release, BLUESAmericana, earning three nominations on its own as well as a producer/engineer/artist GRAMMY Certificate for his track on the 2001 Country Album of the Year, Hank Williams Tribute – Timeless. The talented artist has also been awarded 14 Blues Foundation Awards and 6 BMI Awards for his work in TV & Film.   Over the past two decades, Keb’ has cultivated a reputation as a modern master of American roots music through the understated excellence of his live and studio performances. Artists who have recorded his songs include B.B. King, Buddy Guy, the Dixie Chicks, Joe Cocker, Robert Palmer, Tom Jones, Melissa Manchester, Solomon Burke and the Zac Brown Band to name a few. The list of artist collaborations comprises a who’s who in the music industry and includes Bonnie Raitt, Taj Mahal, Vince Gill, Amy Grant, Jackson Browne, Natalie Cole, Lyle Lovett, India Arie, James Cotton, Bobby Rush, Timothy B. Schmit, Marcus Miller and many more. His guitar playing has garnered him two invites to Eric Clapton’s acclaimed Crossroads Festival and has inspired leading instrument makers, Gibson Brands, to issue the Keb’ Mo’ Signature Bluesmaster and Bluesmaster Royale acoustic guitars and Martin Guitars to issue the HD-28KM Keb’ Mo’ Limited Edition Signature model.   He has been featured in TV and film, playing Robert Johnson in the 1998 documentary “Can’t You Hear The Wind Howl,” appeared three times on the television series, “Touched By An Angel,” and was the ghostly bluesman Possum in John Sayles’ 2007 movie, “Honeydripper.” Keb’ created “Martha’s Theme” for the TV show Martha Stewart Living. Keb’ also wrote and performed the theme song for the hit sitcom, Mike & Molly, created by Chuck Lorre and was music composer for TNT’s Memphis Beat starring Jason Lee. In early 2017, nine songs from Keb’s extensive catalog were featured in the film Signed, Sealed, Delivered: Higher Ground on the Hallmark Movies and Mysteries channel. This film was also Keb’s first feature film lead acting role. He also appears in an episode on the CMT series “Sun Records” as Howlin’ Wolf and can be heard playing his original song “Operator.” Keb’ has played his iconic version of “America The Beautiful” in the series finale of Aaron Sorkin’s “The West Wing,” as well as at the actual White House for President Obama.   Keb’ Mo’ has been a long-time supporter of the Playing For Change Foundation (PFCF), a nonprofit organization that creates positive change through music education. PFCF provides free music education to children in nine countries, including Brazil, Bangladesh, Ghana, Mali, Nepal, Rwanda, South Africa and the United States, and has established 12 music schools around the world. They also work with partners to address basic needs in the communities where they teach, including providing education, clean water, food, medicines, clothing, books, and school supplies.   Additionally, Keb’ is a celebrity mentor with the Kennedy Center’s Turnaround Arts program, which focuses on elementary and middle schools throughout the US. This highly successful program began under the guidance of Michelle Obama and the President’s Committee for the Arts and Humanities. Each artist adopts a school and becomes a mentor, working with teachers, students, parents, and the community to help build a successful arts education program. Keb’ enjoys his mentorship at The Johnson School of Excellence in Chicago, Illinois.   In 2017, Keb’ Mo’ released TajMo, a collaborative album with the legendary Taj Mahal. The project, which won the 2018 GRAMMY for Best Contemporary Blues Album, features guest appearances by Sheila E., Joe Walsh, Lizz Wright and Bonnie Raitt. At the 39th Annual Blues Music Awards, Keb’ Mo’, alongside Blues Hall of Famer Taj Mahal, was awarded Album of the Year and Contemporary Blues Album of the Year for their first-ever collaboration project, TajMo. Keb’ also took home the title of Contemporary Blues Male Artist of The Year. The multi-generational duo went on to tour the US and Europe in support of their album.   Twenty-five years after the release of his debut album under the moniker Keb’ Mo’, the widely admired artist released his most recent album, Oklahoma (Concord Records), winning him a 2020 GRAMMY Award for Best Americana Album. Featuring cameos from Taj Mahal, Rosanne Cash, Robert Randolph, Jaci Velasquez and Keb’ Mo’s wife, Robbie Brooks Moore, Keb’ delivers an album that pushes his boundaries even further with brand new songs addressing topics such as immigration, depression, pollution, love, female empowerment and more. Following the deeply thought-provoking release, Keb’ lightened the mood with the release of his first-ever holiday album, Moonlight, Mistletoe & You. A decade in the making, Moonlight, Mistletoe & You includes six original songs and four cover tunes including “Please Come Home for Christmas.”

Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes
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Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes

June 13, 2021

Emerging in the '70's from the same New Jersey Shore music scene as his legendary contemporary and friend Bruce Springsteen, Southside's first three albums, I Don't Want To Go Home, This Time It's for Real, and Hearts of Stone, were produced by band co-founder Steven Van Zandt, and largely featured songs penned by Van Zandt and/or Springsteen. The Van Zandt-written “I Don’t Want To Go Home” became Southside’s signature song, an evocative mixture of horn-based melodic riffs and sentimental lyrics. In 1982 Rolling Stone Magazine voted Hearts of Stone among the top 100 albums of the 1970s and 1980s.   With their classic blend of hard-core R&B and street-level rock, molten grooves, soulful guitar licks and blistering horn section, Johnny and his Jukes continue to put their unique stamp on the Jersey Shore sound, while recalling the glory years of Otis Redding and similar Stax Records titans.

Pokey LaFarge
Rams Head On Stage

Pokey LaFarge

June 12, 2021

Day after day, pencil in hand, always dressed in blue. Never feeling satisfied. Itchy. Incomplete. Attired halfway between a businessman and a janitor, Pokey LaFarge tries to make sense of trouble he’s seen and trouble he’s been in. This is the Great Why of his unending passion for songwriting. An unquenchable need to be heard in a world where everyone is talking and nobody is listening.   The songs on Pokey’s transformative new album MANIC REVELATIONS demand your attention. Here, you get the feeling this man is constantly reshuffling the deck in favor of some outcome or other. Each chord, each riff shades the stories he sets up in his lyrics. But make no mistake – no matter how the cards lay, he is searching for the purest truth; he loves laying in the muck. Whatever it takes to serve the song. He wouldn’t know what to do if his life were any other way.   Sit with him over a cup of coffee at The Mud House on Cherokee Street in South City St. Louis, and you’ll see for yourself: he easily is uneasy, pushing one squalid thought away to make way for another, sometimes darker one. It’s not that he’s a miserable guy; quite the opposite. To lay it plain: you simply don’t get songs like these without becoming very friendly with the darkness in your head, and with the social distortion of the day. These are the currents Pokey dips into to create his songs.   In conversation, he’ll stare right through you as you speak. They call it the Quiet Eye. It’s that uncanny ability the best athletes in the world have; it’s what sets them apart. Pokey has it too. You see this with pitchers in Pokey’s beloved game of baseball. A guy can look at a complex scene and instantly focus on what he needs to do to get a strike. In a noisy stadium, there’s a focus from the mound to the catcher’s mitt. That’s the game. In a flash, the ball moves at 90-some-odd miles per hour, and the fate of an entire city hangs in the balance. When that pitcher’s focus delivers, a game is won – and a banged up old Midwestern city like St. Louis is instantly elevated to an all-century high.   Taking a sip of his ever-present cup of black coffee (switched out for red wine every day at sunfall), Pokey is the pitcher who breaks his stillness, winds up, and fires off the final strike of a shutout. At the table, he eventually tips his gaze to you, inhales, and launches back into the conversation. In these moments, Pokey’s as likely to agree with what you’ve just said as he is to turn the table upside down.   Knowing that music is as influential in today’s jagged American culture as the country’s favorite pastime, it’s powerful to see Pokey locking into and emerging from his Quiet Eye stance. Again, you don’t get songs like these without a little fire. And when the conversation turns to the heat that brews in his own belly, Pokey leans in, stares straight ahead, and offers this: “The darkness? The anger? It comes out in my singing. With a beautiful lyric and a beautiful melody. It comes out in the passion.”   “All these opinions out there…” he trails off, looking over his right shoulder at a painting of Woody Guthrie hanging on the wall. “It’s about getting people to feel something. Other than anger.”   Plenty of feelings reveal themselves in the 10 forlorn, haunting melodies on MANIC REVELATIONS. Each one of these songs is the culmination of a decade of hard work in what has become something of a bellwether city. And with the release of these 10 songs, St. Louis will have something more than World Series wins to mark a moment in time.   But Pokey has no intention of winning any accolades with his music. He just wants to get more at home with the noise in his head. Comfortable would be nice, but nobody’s ever heard Pokey speak of a dream of an easy life. Those types of songs are for somebody else to sing. Pokey LaFarge makes good truck out of this thing that he pushes against – whatever it may be in a given moment.   “That’s what the record’s about: confronting,” says Pokey. “For me, this whole album is about composing and confronting.”

Hollis Brown - 50 Years of Getting "Loaded"
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Hollis Brown - 50 Years of Getting "Loaded"

June 11, 2021

Hollis Brown is an American Rock ‘n’ Roll band. Named after a Bob Dylan song (“The Ballad of Hollis Brown”), the band was formed by Queens-natives and songwriters Mike Montali (lead vocals/guitar) and Jonathan Bonilla (lead guitar). Both 2nd-generation immigrants (Italian-American and Puerto Rican-American, respectively), they soon found their musical brethren across America, recruiting Andrew Zehnal (drums) from Cleveland, and Adam Bock (keyboard/vocals) from St. Louis. Hollis Brown’s latest single “Run Right To You” was released on 7” vinyl in October 2016 on Velvet Elk/One Little Indian records. Their song “Steady Ground” is a featured exclusive on Amazon’s playlist Amazon Acoustics. The band’s vinyl EP, Cluster of Pearls (Alive Naturalsound Records), was chosen as one of the 300 select releases throughout the world for Record Store Day 2016. Pressed on Starburst Vinyl, the record is limited to 800 copies and features four previously unreleased tracks and two songs released on vinyl for the first time. It was released digitally on iTunes in August 2016. Cluster of Pearls follows up the 2015 release of Hollis Brown’s third album 3 Shots (Jullian Records/RED), featuring the Bo Diddley collaboration “Rain Dance,” and the duet “Highway 1” with acclaimed alt-country songstress Nikki Lane. The independent act has achieved a significant amount of success since their formation in 2009. They released their debut album Ride On The Train on Alive Naturalsound in 2013 (produced by Adam Landry), garnering song and video premieres from Rolling Stone, Paste, and American Songwriter, along with music placements in the worldwide trailer for the Michael Keaton film “The Founder,” the Willem Dafoe/Matt Dillon film “Bad Country,” Direct TV’s “Kingdom”; Showtime’s “Shameless,” MTV’s “Real World,” and an online ad campaign for Abercrombie & Fitch. Following a Lou Reed tribute concert in NYC, Alive Naturalsound asked the band to record a tribute to the Velvet Underground’s classic album Loaded, as a limited-edition vinyl release for Record Store Day 2014. Hollis Brown Gets Loaded took on a life of its own, with airplay on influential radio stations, resulting in a full CD & digital release. The band has toured extensively in America and Europe, headlining and supporting such bands as The Counting Crows, Citizen Cope, The Zombies, Jackie Greene, Heartless Bastards, Rich Robinson of Black Crowes, and Jesse Malin, and building an impressive fan base on both continents.

David Crosby & the Sky Trails Band
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David Crosby & the Sky Trails Band

June 8, 2021

Two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Famer and co-founder of the Byrds and Crosby, Stills & Nash, David Crosby is heading out on tour in May and June. Joining him will be five musical friends,collectively and affectionately known as the ‘Skytrails Band’.James Raymond on keys, Mai Leiszon bass, Steve DiStanislao on drums, Jeff Pevar on guitar and Michelle Willis on keyboards and vocals. Crosby is in the midst of an incredibly creative and powerful period, showcasing his skills as the brilliant songwriter that he is.On this tour, he will be performing some of his best loved songs and greatest hits from right across his illustrious career, alongside material from the forthcoming Skytrails band album, plus a few surprises as well.

Second Helping: The American Lynyrd Skynyrd Show
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Second Helping: The American Lynyrd Skynyrd Show

June 6, 2021

Lynyrd Skynyrd re-united in 1987. Second Helping formed after attending a 1987 Lynyrd Skynyrd rehearsal. Founding member Chris McCallister attended a rehearsal after being invited by his friend and Skynyrd guitarist, Ed King. During the rehearsal, Chris was just amazed at the unbelievable tightness that Skynyrd had after 10 years of not playing with each other. During a break Chris was chatting with the Skynyrd members and asked, “How long are you guys going to do this?” They said, “Just this year. We are only doing a certain amount of shows as a tribute to the fans.” Chris replied, “Wow, are you kidding? Someone should do a tribute to you!” Skynyrd guitarist Gary Rossington laughed and said, “What? Like Beatlemania?” McCallister went back to Tampa and began forming his tribute band to Skynyrd. At first, his band Next Exit, did a set of Skynyrd; it went over well! Then they did two sets; it went over. Next Exit broke up and that paved the way to form a full-on tribute. By 1988, Second Helping began playing, they signed with Lustig Entertainment and began touring. Through the years Second Helping has maintained their friendship with original Skynyrd members, Ed King, Leon Wilkeson, Billy Powell, and Lacy Van Zant. Today Second Helping and Skynyrd guitarist Randall Hall remain good friends and from time to time get to share the stage. Guitarist from Second Helping were actually taught the guitar parts from some of the Skynyrd guitarists (Ed King/Randall Hall). Second Helping was one of the first tribute shows in America. They have played all over the United States, Canada, and Mexico. They were the only tribute to play on MTV, live. Second Helping continues to play across the United States, paying their respects to the friends and Hall of Famers, Lynyrd Skynyrd. Second Helping is much more than a Lynyrd Skynyrd tribute band; it is a showcase for classic Skynyrd music. Expect a big show, a big sound, and an evening that will bring you back to a time of youth, fun, and hope. Expect every note to be exact. They come with the full compliment of a Lynyrd Skynyrd show.

The East Pointers
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The East Pointers

June 1, 2021

Redefining the ever-evolving genre–modern folk–with Billboard-worthy pop hooks, deep acoustic groove, trance-like trad breakdowns and three-part harmonies, Tim Chaisson (vocals/fiddle/percussion), Koady Chaisson (banjo/tenor guitar/moog) and Jake Charron (guitar/keyboards), already internationally acknowledged as musical trailblazers, have made sure their new album, Yours To Break, will light a path for a new generation of music lovers who don’t care for labels. What We Leave Behind was one of the international standout albums of 2017, nominated for the "Traditional Roots Album of the Year’ at the 2018 JUNO Awards and attracting over four million streams on Spotify. In the short time between their 2015 JUNO Award-winning debut Secret Victory and the upcoming album Yours To Break, the band has performed over 450 shows in Australia, New Zealand, Japan, the UK, Europe, Mexico, the USA, and Canada. Yours To Break sits uneasily in a classic genre demarcation. The East Pointers have always been musically complex and technically brilliant, the core is definitely traditional Celtic, but on the new album, fiddle tunes are grounded in complex rumbling bass lines, a dirty Americana exploration turns on a dime into a lighthearted guitar feature with flamenco reference palmas, playful keyboard tones turn traditional solos into urgent dance-party journeys, and off-the-leash festival jam sessions give rise to vocal numbers that are either perfect pop songs or moving tributes to the home and people they love. “I feel like this album is the best expression to date of the band’s appreciation for so many different types of music and the fact that we as a band are comfortable enough in our own musical voice to start expressing those influences and loves.” says Koady Chaisson, who plays either banjo or tenor guitar on stage, along with the bass pedals underpinning much of the groove of this album. Taken from a line in the song ‘Elmira’ – a tune named for a town in Prince Edward Island near where fiddler, Tim Chaisson, and his cousin, banjo player Koady Chaisson, grew up – Yours To Break puts a pin in the creative landscape in which the band currently sits, as well as where they may be headed.

The Subdudes
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The Subdudes

May 31, 2021

Over the course of 25 years and ten albums, the Subdudes have quietly become one of America’s national music treasures.   Led by singer/guitarist Tommy Malone and accordionist, John Magnie, The Subdudes draw most of their inspiration from the sounds of their native New Orleans, blending blues, gospel, funk, and R&B with their own harmony vocals; their sound is also notable for the band’s substitution of a tambourine player, Steve Amedée, for a drummer. Tim Cook rounds out the band on bass.   Their music features an intoxicating blend of passionate, joyous roots music, not to mention some of the sharpest musicianship and ensemble playing you’ll ever hear from any musicians. More than a just a concert, the “dudes” leave you feeling like they’re having a party and you were lucky enough to be invited.

The Subdudes
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The Subdudes

May 30, 2021

Over the course of 25 years and ten albums, the Subdudes have quietly become one of America’s national music treasures.   Led by singer/guitarist Tommy Malone and accordionist, John Magnie, The Subdudes draw most of their inspiration from the sounds of their native New Orleans, blending blues, gospel, funk, and R&B with their own harmony vocals; their sound is also notable for the band’s substitution of a tambourine player, Steve Amedée, for a drummer. Tim Cook rounds out the band on bass.   Their music features an intoxicating blend of passionate, joyous roots music, not to mention some of the sharpest musicianship and ensemble playing you’ll ever hear from any musicians. More than a just a concert, the “dudes” leave you feeling like they’re having a party and you were lucky enough to be invited.

Tab Benoit
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Tab Benoit

May 26, 2021

Tab Benoit is a Grammy nominated singer, songwriter and guitarist who has built a remarkable 30+ year career on the foundation of his gritty and soulful Delta swamp blues and acquiring a devoted legion of fans along the way, as well as 5 Blues Music Awards, including BB King Entertainer of the Year (twice) and an induction into The Louisiana Music Hall of Fame. He has recorded and/or performed with Junior Wells, George Porter Jr, Dr. John, Willie Nelson, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, Billy Joe Shaver, Maria Muldaur, James Cotton, Cyril Neville, Kenny Aronoff, Allen Toussaint, Kim Wilson, Jimmy Thackery, Charlie Musslewhite, Kenny Neal, Chris Layton, Ivan Neville, Jimmy Hall, Jim Lauderdale, Anders Osborne, and Alvin Youngblood Hart to name a few. Tab's accomplishments as a musician are matched only by his devotion to the environmental health of his native Louisiana wetlands. Benoit is the founder and driving force behind Voice of the Wetlands, an organization working to preserve the coastal waters of his home state. In 2010, he received the Governor's Award for Conservationist of the Year from the Louisiana Wildlife Federation. Benoit also starred in the iMax motion picture Hurricane on the Bayou, a documentary of Hurricane Katrina's effects and a call to protect and restore the wetlands.

Tab Benoit
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Tab Benoit

May 25, 2021

Tab Benoit is a Grammy nominated singer, songwriter and guitarist who has built a remarkable 30+ year career on the foundation of his gritty and soulful Delta swamp blues and acquiring a devoted legion of fans along the way, as well as 5 Blues Music Awards, including BB King Entertainer of the Year (twice) and an induction into The Louisiana Music Hall of Fame. He has recorded and/or performed with Junior Wells, George Porter Jr, Dr. John, Willie Nelson, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, Billy Joe Shaver, Maria Muldaur, James Cotton, Cyril Neville, Kenny Aronoff, Allen Toussaint, Kim Wilson, Jimmy Thackery, Charlie Musslewhite, Kenny Neal, Chris Layton, Ivan Neville, Jimmy Hall, Jim Lauderdale, Anders Osborne, and Alvin Youngblood Hart to name a few. Tab's accomplishments as a musician are matched only by his devotion to the environmental health of his native Louisiana wetlands. Benoit is the founder and driving force behind Voice of the Wetlands, an organization working to preserve the coastal waters of his home state. In 2010, he received the Governor's Award for Conservationist of the Year from the Louisiana Wildlife Federation. Benoit also starred in the iMax motion picture Hurricane on the Bayou, a documentary of Hurricane Katrina's effects and a call to protect and restore the wetlands.

Walter Beasley
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Walter Beasley

May 24, 2021

Over the past three decades, saxophonist, Walter Beasley, has artfully and dynamically redefined the phrase “musical Renaissance Man” for the modern generation. Considered by fans and critics alike as the “heir to Grover Washington, Jr.’s Throne,” Beasley is the acclaimed saxophonist, vocalist, educator, and entrepreneur of the decade. As the highest selling full-time Professor / Recording Artist in history, the Boston-based musician has long mastered an exhilarating high wire act of balancing a successful career as a contemporary jazz recording artist and performer with an equally thriving presence in the field of music education.   A leading alto and soprano saxophonist and prominent vocalist all the same, Beasley is hailed by fans for his thrilling performances along the East Coast and throughout the U.S. and Caribbean. Notable performances include the all-star tour To Grover, With Love, performing alongside Chuck Loeb, Buddy Williams and Andy Snitzer and performing as the headlining act for the 2011 Playboy Jazz Festival.   As to the release of his latest CD/DVD project, “Live In The Club,” Beasley’s chart-topping single, “Groove In You,” debuted on the Groove Jazz Chart at #29, climbing to Top 20 on the Billboard/R&R Chart, Radiowave, SmoothJazz.com, & Mediabase, earning a spot in the Top 10 on the Indie Chart. Other notable works by Beasley include his self-titled albums, Sax Meditations and Live in the Groove, both released through his Affable Publishing, as well as Free Your Mind (Heads Up), whose presence earned Beasley the 2009 Jazz Awards, and Backatcha (Shanachie Entertainment / Affable), featuring his hot single, “Lovely Day.” During 2011, Backatcha rose to #10 on Billboard Top 50, with his single “The Call” debuting at 30 on Billboard Smooth Jazz chart and #3 Most Added in June 2011.   Since 2008, Beasley continues to thrive at the forefront of digital media and communication by offering consultation services to independent sax artists via Skype. Students are worldwide and of all ages and skill levels. He extends his influence to the younger generation by sharing his experiences and educational expertise through “Walter Beasley Sax Lessons” on YouTube and through his educational app offerings on iTunes and Google. Beasley also creates instructional DVDs for young players who are not able to afford a traditional music education. Projects include 14 Steps To Maximizing your Performance, which is currently available for download on his official website. His other best selling videos released through his Affable Publishing include Sound Production for the Saxophone, Hip Hop Improvisation, Circular Breathing and Performance Workshop.   A native of El Centro, CA, Beasley found his calling in the 1970’s after his Aunt gave him his first Grover Washington, Jr. record at the age of nine. During his early teens, Beasley played sax and sang in various bands throughout Southern California. In the following years, Beasley attended the prestigious Berklee College of Music and graduated alongside such prominent classmates as saxophonist, Branford Marsalis, and vocalist, Rachelle Ferrell. Upon graduation, Beasley accepted a teaching position at Berklee where he continues to share his musical genius with students, nearly 30 years later.

Rubix Kube 80s Tribute (Dance Floor)
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Rubix Kube 80s Tribute (Dance Floor)

May 23, 2021

RUBIX KUBE has taken the universe by storm as the most excellent ‘80s tribute band of all time! Its one-of-a-kind “THE EIGHTIES STRIKE BACK Show” is performed in their NYC headquarters, across the planet, and to galaxies far . . far away. The KUBE is more than just a cover band - it's a totally awesome, true '80s Experience. Every super-charged show takes it to the max and guarantees to set the roof on fire and burn down the house. (Metaphorically speaking of course.)   RUBIX KUBE is led by a male and female dynamic duo of karma chameleons, able to transform in the-blink-of-an-eye into the voice and character of any '80s icon. It's like Madonna, Michael Jackson, Cher, Prince, Devo, Bon Jovi, Guns N’ Roses, and more are teleported right before your eyes on the same stage, in one concert! Their supporting sidekicks are some of the most awesome and versatile musicians around, including guitarist Steve Brown of the million-selling Rock band TRIXTER. All are decked out in vibrant, vintage '80s threads and with enough hairspray to take down Freddy Krueger, The Terminator, Beetlejuice, and all The Gremlins at once. The KUBE is able to crank out Pop, Rock, New Wave, Dance and Hair Metal hits from the decade of decadence, and perform them just like the originals - yet with their own gnarly twist.   Talkshow host Kelly Ripa has praised RUBIX KUBE as "Amazing. You definitely have to check it out, it's so much fun. It's like going back to The Eighties!"   RUBIX KUBE has shared the stage with actual '80s rockstars & legends including: Rick Springfield, Tiffany, Debbie Gibson, Bret Michaels of Poison, Dee Snider of Twisted Sister, MC Hammer, Night Ranger, Mike Score of A Flock Of Seagulls, Colin Hay of Men At Work, Taylor Dayne, and Tone Loc. RUBIX KUBE has had featured TV segments & interviews on The TODAY Show, FUSE, FOX News, Bethenny and parts on hit reality TV shows "Cake Boss" and "Dirty Money". The ever-expanding list of celebrity fan attendees include: Kelly Ripa, Katie Couric, Lance Bass, & Chris Kirkpatrick (of N 'Sync), Boomer Esiason, Mark Sanchez, Miley Cyrus, and Ivanka Trump.   Prepare for the most bodacious, totally rad and ultimate time-warp at “THE EIGHTIES STRIKE BACK Show" starring RUBIX KUBE!

Lotus Land: American Rush Tribute
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Lotus Land: American Rush Tribute

November 28, 2020

With an unparalleled performance, The American RUSH Tribute Lotus Land brings the force of live Rush to life on stage. Enjoyed by die-hard Rush fans, musicians, and casual music listeners alike, the Lotus Land experience has been heralded as the ultimate celebration of RUSH's musical craftsmanship and spirited performances. Their performances have wowed sold-out houses in premiere concert venues and their fan base continues to grow nationally and internationally.

Sabbath: The Complete Black Sabbath Experience
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Sabbath: The Complete Black Sabbath Experience

October 24, 2020

The closest thing there is to classic Black Sabbath show! Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of this iconic and influential band, ‘Sabbath performs to perfection, note for note and with identical tones and instruments.